Asbestos Exposure in Louisiana 2013-11-22T08:16:09+00:00

Asbestos Exposure in Louisiana

Asbestos exposure can occur in any number of settings but the most common areas we see in Louisiana are:

Shipyards for Ship Construction and Repair

With its location on the Mississippi River, the port of New Orleans houses many ship building and repair operations that may have used asbestos-containing materials at one time. Such materials came in the form of insulation and pipe coverings used in the engine, boilers and other equipment which reaches extreme temperatures in the hull of a ship.

Pipe fitters, boiler makers, electricians and even general laborers who may have had to walk through areas with heavy asbestos exposure are all at risk of contracting diseases such as mesothelioma.

Factories

Many factories would incorporate asbestos containing materials in their heating plants or general manufacturing facilities. As in shipyards, asbestos materials were often used to deal with machinery subject to heating such as boilers. Additionally several factories producing insulation and other materials used for construction purposes can be found throughout Louisiana.

Construction Sites

Commercial buildings such as apartments, schools and even hospitals as well as residential homes often utilized asbestos-containing materials during construction. These common jobsite materials may have included roofing products, joint compound, shingles, floor tile or adhesives. Sanding tiles can also release asbestos fibers. However roofers and insulators are considered high risk for this area due to the amount of dust and fibers in roofing and insulation products.

Home builders, contractors, laborers, electricians, plumbers and all of the trades associated with construction may have been at risk of exposure at some time.

Auto Repair

Automotive brakes and clutches commonly used asbestos as a prime ingredient. Today companies must abide by strict exposure regulations but in the past auto mechanics would often come in contact with brake linings, brake shoes, clutches and automotive gaskets which may have used asbestos. Often these materials would be swept up with brooms or compressed air, subjecting all workers in the vicinity to be exposed to Asbestos-laden dust.

Family Member Exposure

Families of workers who were exposed to asbestos may be at risk as well. Family or secondary exposure can have potentially fatal consequences.

Where Asbestos Hazards Might Be Found In Your Home

  • Any roofing and siding shingles made of asbestos cement.
  • Houses built between 1930 and 1950 may have asbestos insulation.
  • Textured paint and patching compounds used on wall or ceiling joints prior to 1977.
  • Artificial ashes and embers used in gas-fired fireplaces.
  • Walls and floors around wood-burning stoves may be protected with asbestos paper, millboard, or cement sheets.
  • Vinyl floor tiles and the backing on vinyl sheet flooring and adhesives.
  • Older hot water and steam pipes may be coated with asbestos insulation or covered with an asbestos blanket or tape.

[SOURCE: http://www.EPA.gov]